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tech:content-creation:wordpress:write-in-word [2019/02/21 16:24]
Olivier Simard-Casanova created
tech:content-creation:wordpress:write-in-word [2019/02/21 16:37] (current)
Olivier Simard-Casanova [Equations]
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 {{page>​snippets:​in-construction&​noheader&​nofooter}} {{page>​snippets:​in-construction&​noheader&​nofooter}}
 <​lead>​ <​lead>​
-====== Write in Word ======+====== Write WordPress posts in Word ======
  
 </​lead>​ </​lead>​
  
 </​panel>​ </​panel>​
 +
 +Word is a great app to write things (yes, I know, but this is what I think! It's powerful, it's versatile, it's present everywhere, and compared to [other writing tools](https://​ulysses.app/​pricing/​),​ it's after all not that expensive. And while not an open format, `.docx` files are quite well documented now). And it could be too to write blog posts. But the problem is that copy/​pasting text written in Word in the WordPress editor does not usually work. Too often you need to work back on the styling – and I have much others things to do that redoing something I already done in the first place.
 +
 +Luckily, if you use [this plugin](https://​wordpress.org/​plugins/​mammoth-docx-converter/​),​ you can solve yourself a lot of headaches!
 +
 +The idea is simple:
 +
 +1. write your post in Word
 +2. create a new post on WordPress
 +3. import your Word document in the newly created WordPress post
 +4. check if the formatting is OK
 +5. publish!
 +
 +This solution only works in an environment where you can install third-party plugins, i.e. mostly self-hosted WordPress.
  
 ## Equations ## Equations
  
-- Use KaTeX (much lighter than MathJax) +- Use [KaTeX](https://​wordpress.org/​plugins/​wp-katex/​) ​(much lighter than MathJax) 
-- If you need to rely on images: produce equations with LaTeXiT as JPEG images+- If you need to rely on images: produce equations with LaTeXiT ​(on a Mac) as JPEG images. Quality may be low, the workaround is to create images of a larger police font and downscale them manually afterwards. 
 +- If your WordPress posts are forwared to your readers via emails with MailPoet: avoid using inline math. But display equations works quite well! For inline math, use regular caracters, it's working well. 
 + 
 +## Preserved formatting 
 + 
 +- If you embed images in your Word document, they will be uploaded in your WordPress post. 
 +- Fonts will match your WordPress'​ themes. 
 +  - Good thing, as you can write your blog post in any font you want without affecting the output 
 +  - Bad thing, as you may want to use a custom font that match your Word font 
 +- Bold and italic are preserved 
 +- Equations written with the Word equation editor don't work (use KaTeX instead, see above) 
 +- Headings are preserved: heading 2 in Word turns into heading 2 in WordPress 
 +- Footnotes are preserved
  • Last modified: 7 months ago
  • by Olivier Simard-Casanova